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will lead the operation when the u.s. steps back in the days ahead, though nato is expected to play a major role. meanwhile, a u.s. air force fighter jet crashed today in eastern libya. the two men on board ejected and were rescued. a cbs news poll out tonight finds most americans are following the events in libya closely and nearly seven out of ten approve of the air strikes. mandy clark begins our coverage from the scene of that fighter jet crash. >> reporter: this is all that remains of the american f-15e that went down last night. a steady stream of people came to have a look. saleh saeed saleh, a local farmer, was eager to show us the wreckage. when it it this ground he says it sounded like a rocket exploding. he thought qaddafi's forces were on the attack. officials say the fighter jet crashed because of a mechanical error rather than any enemy fire. it landed east of benghazi which is in the heart of rebel territory. the jet's crew ejected safely. were they okay? were they injured? "the person i saw had minor injuries, just scratches" he says. one of the americans landed in a nearby
>>> on the broadcast tonight, who's in charge? is the u.s. about to hand over control of the attack on libya? and tonight what may be the next nation to go in that region. >>> changing face. a major milestone tonight for a growing group of americans. >>> asleep in the tower. two jets needing to land in washington can't raise an air traffic controller, and now we know why. >>> and making a difference, for the struggling people of japan. nbc news with americans on a mission to provide critical re leaf. "nightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. it has turned into a big miliry effort, bombs and cruise missiles have been raining down on libya, and it could get even bigger and the stakes are high. it's been a mostly u.s. run air campaign thus far, but tonight a change is coming. a handover to nato for the supervision of this strike. everyone, even though the pentagon warned libya today, we will continue to hit you, the u.s. is anxious to shift some of this to somebody else. and just as there have been new and loud explosions in tripoli this
congress to continue to be involved. nancy pelosi said u.s. action will be strengthened by consultation with congress. last week a lot of them spoke under the democratic side were critical of president obama for not briefing congress in regards to what the mission was in libya. they feel on the democratic side more aware of what that is and want to be briefed regularly. secretary of state hillary clinton will be beyond with the foreign relations committee. they expect a lot of questions to her, but in terms of setting a precedent for the democratic party to believe in, president obama did accomplish that goal. he did not satisfy republicans at all. one interesting caveat i will say, senator john mccain, the president's opponent actually said he enjoyed hearing president obama clearly state what the policy was in libya. he remained shall we say unaware of how gadhafi would be removeed fr per wldikmo iorti outh, t ppti o what the president's actions were there. john mccain maybe going back to the maverick style by being more supportive of president obama than his conference there. >> the
site and take our non-scientific "you decide" poll. should the u.s. go after moammar qaddafi? 14% of you have say yes. you can still weigh in. bill: we have a fox news alert. police on the scene at the airport. a suspicious package located near one of the baggage carousels. not quite sure what's in it if anything. police say they do not think it's related to what we saw last night. did you see this ranging fire last night? look at these pictures. this is at the airport in miami. the fire breaking out in the area where the fuel is kept. it was not near a runway or terminal. this morning there could be flight delays because the airport is running at 40% fuel capacity. look at the night skylight up in miami. we are giving you a live report at the airport to find out what happened at the fire and also what's going on with this suspicious package. >> tense moments in the sky as two passenger flights are forced to land without help from anyone in the airport control tower. it happened at reagan national airport just across the river from our nation's capitol. take a listen as the contr
obama from the east room of the white house essentially saying the u.s. will help lead the international enforcement of a no-fly zone over libya. he also took some time there outlining what american forces will not be doing. >> the united states is not going to deploy ground troops into libya and we are not going the use force to go beyond a well-defined goal. >> in moments i'll be speaking live with nic robertson in libya and wolf blitzer about who makes the next move here. that's in just a moment. we're also learning here as we're staying on top of the story in japan, we're learning trace amounts of radiation have reached the united states' west coast, all the way from this fukushima daiichi power plant in japan. so i'll be speaking with the mayor of los angeles shortly. and we'll find out what the new danger rating is right around fukushima, where that power plant is still out of control here. it's been one week to the day after the earthquake and tsunami hit. looked at this video here, video that was flagged for us, showing some of the new views we're getting from the powerful tsunam
in the world is the u.s. military involved in libya? republicans are the toughest critics. there are echos inside the democratic party. >> i really don't believe that we have an obligation to get involved in every single occurrence in that part of the world. >> the immediate thing congress needs to do when it returns is to cut off any funds for containing libya. >> in a statement senator j. rockefeller wrote of serious concerns. our military and budget are stretched thin fighting two wars already. and i want to avoid getting into another conflict with unknown cost and consequences. tomorrow night, the president addresses the nation. today, a muddled mission against gadhafi. we spoke with carl leven and chaos throughout the mideast with former national security adviser stephen hadley and the former head of the cia, general michael hayden. and then assessing growing concern over japan's nuclear disaster with nuclear analyst joseph sorincioni and the impact on this with economist alice rivlin and douglas holtz aiken. i'm candy crowley and this is "state of the union." coalition air strikes po
the u.s. mission there in libya about cost, about an exit strategy. the president and other senior administration officials have talked about this and narrowly defined in their row focus of this mission. and that the u.s., which has been taking a supporting -- a leading role rather would move in the second phase to a supporting role. what would that look like? well, jay carney, white house spokesman today said that u.s. jets would not be used in enforcing any kind of no-fly zone but it would be more of an assist role perhaps providing jamming technology, even intelligence. so that is how the white house sees this next phase of the mission in live xwrap but again, no official reaction yet to this agreement. one other point i should make is that you know, we're waiting to find out if perhaps the president will make any public comments about this to the american people. there have been a lot of questions about the president perhaps not fully explaining all of the ins and outs of this mission to the american people. the white house has pushed back on that saying from the beginning whet
about this? "jihadis that fought us the u.s. in iraq and afghanistan now enjoy american support in libya." excuse me? that means the people who we were actually shooting at on the battlefield, we now giving arms to in libya. this libya rebel commander says his fighters have al-qaeda links. we'll have more on the story at the bottom of the hour. let's see if we have this right. we have a nobel peace prize winning president, encouraging unrest in the mast. saying rise up, isn't this great? look, now people are rising up. people are getting killed everywhere. then he gave the commander to launch america's third military conflict with a muslim nation that poses no immediate threat. never made the case to the american people. and no exit strategy. no one is even asking or answering the question what does victory look like? chaos. the "new york times" is reporting now that the muslim brotherhood has now formed a tactic partnership with the egyptian military. oh, that seems great. and they're poised to grab control. what do you say? shirria law? no -- shiria law? no. in libya, guess who is lini
is at the white house. jim, let's begin with you in the pentagon now. what is the u.s. military saying about the report that a french jet attacked and destroyed a libyan aircraft? >> well, there were all sorts of conflicting reports from the beginning after a french pilot radioed in to the command aboard the mt. whitney, the u.s. command ship out there in the mediterranean that he had shot down a libyan war plane. at the time, u.s. officials said they could not confirm it and continued to check, but subsequently, it turns out, and again, these are still conflicting reports, that apparently this french pilot shot a libyan airplane of some kind, whether it was a war plenty, whether it was a air,r enivia ple,has tve e, it landed at misratah or was already on the ground. now, of course, what made the first reports very significant is that would have been the first libyan aircraft, military, that would have challenged this no-fly zone. because not a single helicopter or libyan war plane has been in the sky since the u.s. and coalition war planes started to enforce that no-fly zone. but also, beca
is preparing his own take on the u.s. role in the war. >>> also this morning, new fears in japan as radiation levels reach stunning new heights, and the air around the damaged nuclear plant is no longer the worry. rather, it's the water. >>> also something we're keeping an eye on right now in great britain. budget cuts are coming at a high cost for british leaders. protesters on the streets this morning clashing with police officers over proposed austerity measures. we'll have the latest from there. again, this is happening right now. from the cnn center, this is your cnn start morning for this march the 26th. i'm t.j. holmes. we do want to start with a new and disturbing incident in tripoli. this happened today. it's a story that maybe highlights the brutality of a regime that so many people are now fighting against. we want to bring in our cnn international correspondent nic robertson with the latest. tell us what happened. >> reporter: well, t.j., it all began this morning over breakfasttime when a lady came into the hotel, a middle aged appeared to be very respectable lady came into the h
, briefing them to a conference call about the u.s. nato's agreement to take charge of the no-fly zone. over at the pentagon, a top adral haa story that may indicate colonel gadhafi is getting desperate. >> we received reports today that he has taken to armying what he calls volunteers to fight opposition. i'm not sure whether they truly are volunteers or not and i of these ow many recruits he's going to get but i find it interesting that he may now feel it necessary to seek civilian reinforcements. >> reporter: turning nowo the libyan capital, we're joined by cnn senior correspondent nick robertn who is in tripoli. hi, nick. libyan officials, we understand, took you to eastern tripoli today and showed you theon effes of the coalition bombing campaign. what did you see when you were on the outskirts of the city? >> reporter: well, they wanted to show us civilian casualties which they weren't able to. sho us. they took to us a farm that appeared, part of the farmland area had been struck by a missile. we couldn't tell where the missile had come from or even who had fired it. what we saw when
of the replacement team >>> on the broadcast tonight, sending weapons. tonight the prospect of u.s. weapons in the hands of libya's rebel forces. the president says he won't rule it out, so our own richard engel goes inside those rebel forces for a closer look. >>> radiation fears. the nuclear crisis in japan has a lot of people asking could it happen here, and would warning systems work if it did? >>> price check. a new drug to help prevent premature babies, but at what cost for those who need it? >>> and the close call for an american president 30 years ago tonight. what we didn't know until now. >>> also here tonight, the first-ever view of a neighbor of ours. "nightly news" begins now. ightly news" begins now. captions paid for by nbc-universal television >>> good evening. right about now during these past few days across our country, people are watching this unfolding situation in libya. the rebels versus gadhafi. americans have heard president obama defending the u.s. air campaign he ordered, sending our service members to fight a third concurrent conflict far from home. in our conver
, whether the u.s. should help the rebels by providing them with weapons. emily schmidt has the latest. good morning, emily. >> reporter: good morning to you. president obama says he is looking at all options to support the rebels. but when members of the international diplomatic community met in london and had a chance to talk about it, one member said the talk of arming rebels didn't come up. with nato set to take command of military operation, president obama says moammar gadhafi is feeling the pressure. >> the circle around gadhafi understands that the noose is tightening. their days are probably numbered. >> reporter: diplomats from more than three dozen countries met in london yesterday, to discuss libya in a potential post-gadhafi era. >> we must help people plan for their future after the conflict is over. >> reporter: but forces loyal to gadhafi are pushing back rebels from ground they just gained. diplomats say they did not discuss arming the rebels. though, the idea is up for debate. >> there could be a legitimate transfer of arms if i country would choose to do that. >> we are th
. phoenix, arizona on our line for republicans. what should the president say on the u.s. involvement in libya on monday? caller: if he's the intelligent president i want him to tell us why we're going into libya and not the sudan and not bahrain. i think it's un:tionable to open another front when we're spending millions a day on iraq and afghanistan and 50% of our revenue goes to defense. host: the sudan would be another front, too. caller: we could help solve that with humanitarian aid. with the cost in fossil fuels, if we paid the actual cost that fossil fuels cost us, we would pay $12.50 a gallon for gasoline because these wars are about oil. what i'm saying is if he's the innocent president then why doesn't he talk about -- intelligent president why doesn't he talk about the bahrain or sudan? he's doing it for oil just like the last -- just like the iraq war. and i think we need to question why we're doing these things. if we want to help people resisting and trying for democracy, let's do that. but let's not be hidden about our agenda.
and former u.s. ambassador bolten why the arab nations should be be paying for this. and n.a.t.o. leaders missing in action and john hunt, sr., and alan simpson why he he may have to go begging to china for dough. or we will, and that's not good. and the company behind all of those f-16's, former lockheed martin ceo says that air power alone will not win this thing. first, the very latest headlines for you, rebel leadners libya now say the strategic eastern oil town of ebadia is now 100% in the hands of rebel forces and destroying an artillery battery and armored vehicles and the president in a warm-up to the big libyan speech planned for monday night, saying today, countless eyes and destroying gaddafi's air defenses and the president saying that we're succeeding in our mission and democrats and republicans unclear what the mission is. and protests continuing in syria and thousands demonstrates near damascus at the same time and the human rights group reporting 70 political prisoners and stocks in saudi arabia, more than 2% today. that's right, the market was over there. one the view on
in the middle east and tonight a u.s. ally is on the brink. i'm shepard smith. the news starts now. >> the president of yemen now promising to step down on one condition. tonight what he says has to happen and what about american interests if he actually does go. plus, in syria, and in jordan, new anger and new calls for change. l we'll take you inside the growing rage in the region and see what it means for us. >> plus, in libya, nato is getting set to take over the no-fly zone but american forces are still very much a part of this war. tonight, what washington plans and is there any end game? but first on fox this friday night, white house has announced president obama will address the nation monday evening. we're told he'll focus on the situation in libya during comments from the national defense university in d.c. the address is scheduled 7:30 eastern. earlier today he updated congressional leaders on libya and a senior aide says there is no clear end game on how to remove moammar gadhafi from power. more and reaction, as the u.s. prepares to hand thato control of the no-fly zo
, hezbollah bullah. it is also a font for regional instability. both in iraq and against u.s. forces there quite frankly syria matters a lot. and libya doesn't matter quite as much, nearly as much. >> shepard: unlike syria, has no plans for actions in syria. in fact, there is a different leader in syria now. many of the members in congress of both parties who have gone to syria in recent months have said they believe he's a reformer "the fox report" chontd jonathan hunt in our newsroom. assaad a reformer? >> there are many syrians, many middle east experts and many on capitol hill who would laugh at the very idea of president assaad as a reformer. among those, senator jon kyl, the republican whip who said in a statement today and i quote, how many more syrians must president assaad murder or assault before secretary of state clinton no longer endorses the notion that is he a reformer. of course, secretary clinton was actually referring to the view of members of congress, not her own personal view. president assaad is probably better thought of as a northern nicener an economic sense.
libya's air defenses. the u.s. and british military fired a total of 124 tomahawk cruise missiles. u.s. officials say they are getting ready to hand over operational control of the military mission. >> we expect in a matter of days to be able to turn over the primary responsibility to others. we will continue to support the coalition. we'll be a member of the coalition. we'll have a military role in the coalition. we will not have the pre-eminent role. >> let's get the military perspective on this from cnn's pentagon correspondent, chris lawrence. let's start with secretary gates pledge to hand over control in just a couple days. first, what exactly does that mean and is it realistic? >> what it means is they are looking now to set up some sort of structure by which another entity could take control that could be nato although i've been told by a source that there is some reluctance to fly under a nato flag and another thing is so up a separate command and control structure. in one key area u.s. participation may have already peaked this morning. i was told just this morning by an offi
warren christopher. there is the subject of diplomacy. the u.s. is now engaged in three wars in three different muslim countries. the issue of diplomacy has never been more critical, it seems. we are glad you are joining us, including a look back at our interview with warren christopher, right now. >> all i know is his name is james, and he needs extra help with his reading. >> i am james. >> yes. >> to everyone making a difference -- >> thank you. >> you help us all live better. >> nationwide insurance supports tavis smiley. with every question and every answer, nationwide insurance is proud to join tavis in working to improve financial literacy and remove obstacles to economic empowerment, one conversation at a time. nationwide is on your side. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. kcet public television] tavis: a few programming notes. tomorrow night on the program, we will take a look at the relief and recovery operations in japan with architect hitoshi abe and a conversation with known play right eve ensler. later this week, a co-founder of
on innocents here in the u.s. when will the government learn? from new york, defending freedom every night of the week, so long america! >> gregg: tripoli under attack right now. i'm gregg jarrett. a new round of air strikes by the international coalition and we're getting reports that air-raid sirens and explosions are being heard across the libyan capital and on calm's hometown. let's go right to steve harrigan. steve, what can you tell us. >> reporter: in the last few minutes we heard eight loud incoming ex pleogsz to the east of the city of tripoli. clearly audible. one round of three strikes, another round of five. we're not seeing the anti-aircraft fire that usually goes up. a remarkable shift in the battlefield. we are seeing the rebels advance quickly. they have taken four towns previously retreated. brega and one other. it's really being coalition powered that has paved the way targeting gadhafi forces and personnel carriers so the rebels have been able to advance so far without much of a fight. the government officials here say gadhafi forces are making a strategic retreat but it
in jerusalem killed one person and wounded more than 50. israel's ambassador to the u.s. says that the bombing does not appear related to militants' recent rocket attacks on southern israel. >>> defense secretary robert gates met with his israeli counterpart in tel aviv today. and he is urging the israelis to restart peace negotiations with the palestinians. defense officials say that gates believes israel can get ahead of the pop ulous wave across the middle east by pressing a peace deal. >>> and hundreds of potential jurors are at the los angeles county courthouse today. 12 will be chosen to decide whether michael jackson's doctor goes to prison. dr. conrad murray is charged with giving jackson an overdose of an anesthetic. opening statements in the trial are set for may. >>> now more for our top story. there are safety concerns at reagan national airport. after two pilots were unable to reach the control tower before landing. our sandra endo is in washington with details. first of all, sandra, the flight landed safely, but there's still so many questions here. the real issue, why the contro
to support the president. nato will take over responsibility from the u.s. for enforcing the no-fly zone over libya. who is really calling the shots now in the international coalition? welcome to "bbc world news." more coming up in the program and more worries in japan about the fishermen nuclear repay. one of the reactor cores could be damaged -- about the fukushima nuclear plant. in a film that takes you into the interrogation room. we look at four days inside guantanamo. ♪ >> hello, welcome. syria has become the latest hot spot in the middle east, with the ruling elite coming under its biggest challenge in three decades. thousands have demonstrated, calling for more freedom, with protests reported in three more towns. in, protesters climbed about 20 were shot down after a statue of the former president was set alight. in damascus, three people reported to have been killed. ban ki-moon has urged the government to respect and to protect the rights of citizens. protests are taking place elsewhere across the region. in the many capital, , both pro and anti-government demonstrators held their
, by any method. >> now, in a u.s. military briefing just a couple of hours ago, we were told there was no indication gadhafi's forces are moving away from either misrata or ajdabiya. cnn's nic robertson is in the capital city of tripoli. nic, tell me what you have been seeing there if the last 24 hours and also how gadhafi's defiance, if at all, has changed some of the forces within the capital city. >> reporter: well, one of the things we've seen really that reflects the fact that this no-fly zone seems to be fully in place is overnight last night, just before dawn this morning, we heard what sounded like jet aircraft flying overhead and then several loud explosions. so it does give the impression that the coalition can fly and can target locations in and around the city. effectively, it would seem like almost with impunity right now. ajdabiya is a red line for gadhafi. as government officials, they want to hold on to the city. it does appear they're not moving their forces out. the same with misrata. the impression is although a couple of coalition strikes overnight diminis
united does admit that united will be shrinking it's domestic u.s. network because, he says, the focus in the future is going to be on international coverage. >> the domestic u.s. is a very difficult place to make money. brutal regulation and overtaxation, so it's very hard to make money domestically and that's why our growth has been international. even this year as we were originally going to grow between 1% and 2% this year and because of high fuel prices, we have brought that back to flat. but even there, that flat is comprised of shrink the domestic systems and growing the international systems. >> this is fascinating because this tells us that the united-continental merger says that airlines in the united states is going to start to look very different. it's got these massive hubs, chicago, washington, houston, newark, los angeles, san francisco, denver. but they're going to be geared to funneling out to the rest of the world. >> so did he say anything about the frequent flyer miles? that's what i want to know. >> tell me about it. he did admit that between them, united and conti
fighters are being easily out maneuvered. >> it is being reported in the u.s. that president obama signed a secret presidential order in the past three weeks authorizing covert support for opposition forces who have been trying to topple colnel gadhafi. news coming amid a debate of arming the forces opposed to colnel gadhafi. >> the details are fairly sketchy to be honest. we have had confirmation tonight that over the past two or three weeks president obama signed what is called a presidential finding, essentially a directive that paves the way for covert military operations to take place in libya by american forces aiding the rebel forces. there are reports in the "new york times" saying c.i.a. is already in libya, which i don't think some will find too surprising. but so far the white house and c.i.a., as you would expect, refused to comment. >> interesting to point out that we are being told that government sources confirming that barack obama signed this operation some two or three weeks ago, which is interesting because we heard from him last night talking about arming rebels in the
a weekend of punishing allied air attacks in libya. according to u.s. officials, coalition strikes have successfully crippled gadhafi's air defenses and a no-fly zone is effectively in place over the country. although gadhafi himself is not a target of what is being called operation odyssey dawn, one of the strikes caused extensive damage to the libyan leader's tripoli compound last night. at this hour, gadhafi's whereabouts remain unknown. he has vowed to fight a long, drawn out war with western forces. making the rounds on the sunday talk shows, admiral mike mullen stressed that the u.s. role in libya would be limited but he did not give an exact date of how long the u.s. would remain involved. >> there's no one that understands better than i that the stress and the strain that we've been under for a long time in our tenth year of war, both in iraq and in afghanistan. that said, we are within our capability and capacity to be able to execute this mission. the directions have been given to me, it is limited. it is very focused and in that regard, we're more than able, as has been shown
in libya, what's the end game, how do we get out? the role the u.s. will play from here on out and how important is it that gadhafi goes. and how did we wind up fighting in a country that even the country's own defense secretary on sunday said is not a vital u.s. interest. tonight, we'll look at what the president needs to say and the big stakes for him politically in lya if the effort for him goes bad. then we'll bring the president's speech live from the national war college here inform washington, d.c. let's begin with andrea mitch l mitchell. and of course, the huffington post's howard fineman who is an msnbc political analyst. what must the president say? here's a couple of clips. >> when someone like gadhafi threatens a bloodbath that could destabilize an entire region and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> that was the radio address on saturday. here's what he said in south america last week about why we're there. >> our military action is in support of an international man
on intelligence operations and had been careful to what president obama had said publicly that no u.s. ground troops will be sent into libya. but, u.s. officials say there are small cia teams on the ground in eastern libya trying to fair ret out who are the leaders of the opposition? what are their motivations? what do they want for libya. said to be a special. there have been cia operatives in benghazi. when that f-15 jet went down last week and the two pilots ejected. we know one of them ended up in benghazi and some u.s. undercover agents were able to get him out of the country. shep? >> shepard: without some sort of help, it's widely believed or further help i should say it's widely belief these rebels trying to overthrow the government can't win. new debate in washington whether to give those rebels weapons. how is that going? >> that's a tough question, because some military leaders have said they have seen, quote, flickers of al qaeda involvement with the rebels and clearly nobody at the white house or no lawmaker on capitol hill wants to arm a terrorist. the white house said today tha
the u.s. toll the military personnel in japan to keep around the plant. so, we believe the evacuation zone now is voluntary evacuation but that is causing a problem for those who want to get appear because a number of people who is left but there is no gas so people have cars but have not gas for the cars. so they cannot get away from the radiation at the fukushima plants and the highly radioactive water is leaking from four of the troubled nuclear reactors and they think it is seeping out from reactor number three the troublesome of the lot of them, and where we saw the workers trying to tackle the situation, and they received radioactive burns on their legs and feet because they were in a pool of radioactive water that seeped into the boots and were not protected enough for them they have actually absorbed radiation into their bodies, two of the workers have, and the doctors say the prognosis is not looking good. a bit of good news, finally, from japan, and that is tokyo's tap water and the radioactive isotopes they found on when is back in safe levels and has not stopped people fro
: international forces attack muammar qaddafi's military. u.s. and coalition fighters flying more than 150 air anythings over north africa nation and firing 16 cruise missiles in the past 24 hours according to a spokesman after nato agreed last night to assume command of the no-fly zone. but united states and other allied forces are in charm of the rest of the world in including attacks on the ground forces which is the toughest part of the operation and the most controversial. the quick exit does not appear likely and now steve harrigan in the libyan capital but first over to the pentagon. the transition of command is happening. what does it mean? >> we are told from a senior nato official it is being transitioned and it will take 72 hours before general ham can hand over to the nato command structure and the new lieutenant general, the canadian lieutenant general is put in charge of the no-fly zone. the enforcement of the no-fly zone will still be robust. this is not going to just be planes looking for aircraft in the sky. it will be a robust enforcement of the no-fly zone. listen to investi
>>> making news in america this morning -- >> the u.s. gets ready to hand off the mission in libya, after president obama makes his case to the nation, that military intervention was necessary. >>> from california, a sliding hillside puts homes in danger. families told to get out before their houses tumbled down. >>> and the drastic measures taken by one teen who wanted a new car. wait until you hear what she did to get it. >>> and good morning, everyone. thanks for being with us today. president obama takes his case for military action against libya on the road today. it will be part of a major speech that mr. obama gives later today. >> right here in new york. >> and last night, the president spoke to the nation to defend his choices and also to announce that nato will take over the lead role tomorrow. emily schmidt is joining us from washington with all the details. good morning, emily. >> reporter: peggy and rob, good morning to you. before president obama used the word libya last night, he said the words international effort. and he said the world had had a responsibility to a
ruled yemen for 32 years. he is a key u.s. ally in the fight against al qaeda. meanwhile, president obama plans to speak to the nation monday night about libya to explain why he ordered u.s. military action and give an update on the operation. today french and british jets struck libyan artillery and tanks near ajdabiya. smoke could be seen miles away. late today, rebels began a new push to retake the city. and libyan state television showed damage from overnight air strikes in tripoli. nato, which is taking over control of enforcing the no-fly zone, said it's planning for a mission that would last three months. as other nations play a larger role, the u.s. is publicly taking a step back, but it's a small step. more on that from david martin at the pentagon. >> reporter: this is what the battle for libya looks like to a pilot. it's a british pilot attacking a libyan tank. but more than half the 96 strike missions in the past 24 hours were american. and so were all 16 of the tomahawk cruise missiles fired overnight. despite the announcement that nato would soon be taking command of t
information about gadhafi's inner circle reaching out to the united states. senior u.s. officials tell cnn that one of kathd's closest can fi dants, a brother-in-law, has been calling the state department almost every day. arab allies say they're also getting calls. we heard this talk yesterday from secretary of state clinton. though u.s. officials say the intention behind these calls is murky, it could be a sign that gadhafi's regime is looking for a way out. it could also be disinformation being put forward by the u.s. and others to make gadhafi not trust the people around him. in an interview, president obama said that gadhafi could wait it out, even though his forces have been weakened. today, secretary of state clinton said gadhafi and his inner circle have some choices to make. >> it will be up to gadhafi and his insiders to determine what their next steps are. but we would certainly encourage that they would make the right decision. not only institute a real comprehensive cease-fire, but withdraw from the cities and the military actions and prepare for a transition that does not inc
at a major u.s. airport, the very same one where an air traffic controller fell asleep on the job. the close call this time around. >> and she said mexican pirates killed her husband while they were jet skiing on a border lake between texas and mexico. now six months later his body hasn't been found, no one has been arrested. the latest on the investigation, plus what she is vowing to do. it's all new, it's all live, it's "happening now". >>> hi everybody. we have a whole lot of ground to cough today. we're so glad you're with us. i'm jenna lee. jon: we do indeed. i'm jon scott. "happening now", nato takes charge of air operations in libya as the fighting intensifies in one strategic oil town. those are antiqaddafi rebels, giving it all they've got, trying to retake control of brega as they come under rocket fire from pro qaddafi forces, the opposition getting hit hard in other parts of the cup as well. jenna: the u.s. considering a plan to arm the rebels, even though nato's chief is opposed to the idea. right now the cia has operatives on the ground in libya. jon: meantime a sign that qadda
on u.s. actions in libya. that speech is scheduled for monday, 7:30 p.m. eastern time. watch it live right here on the fox news channel. >> heather: as we reported at the top of the show we do have new reaction coming to the death of an american pioneer led the way for women and politics, broke that glass ceiling. >> gregg: joining us -- do we have -- apparently we don't. july july with the latest. >> julie: after suffering complications of blood cancer she had battled for 12 years, geraldine ferraro was surrounded by her family when she passed away this morning at massachusetts general hospital. and president obama just moments ago, he says he will forever be remembered as a trail blazer that broke down barriers for women. whether it was at a public school, a teacher, an assistant district attorney, member of congress or candidate for vice president. she fought to uphold the founding ideals of quality and justice and opportunity for all. she leaves behind her husband, three children and eight grandchildren. in a statement her family says geraldine ferraro was widely known as a leade
for the u.s. in the battle against al qaeda and several hundred loyalists, still scattered around yemen, back country and, seizure of that weapons plant is a blow in that fight. president obama is preparing to address the situation in libya tomorrow night and his decision to intervene has been criticized from both sides of the aisle, some say it came too late. others argue, we shouldn't be involved at all and the president defending his move, saying this weekend it this our national interest. what does the president need to say to get the country on board. david drucker joins us from "roll call", to say it is in our national interest, that is a stretch? >> i don't think it is a stretch but the president has to forcefully and clearly make the case, i think the problem he has had is he did not address the nation on television the moment we went into libya on that saturday and this is something the emerging market have some to expect from presidents -- >> gregg: he's doing it under pressure now. >> i don't know if that is it or, in his mind now is the time. one of the problems the presiden
is recinding his offer to step down by year's end. this as opposition to his regime testifies. they are a key u.s. ally in the fight against al-qaida warns his country is a ticking time bomb that could spiral into civil war without him. a deadly bullet blast killed more than a hundred people. today security forces reportedly fired teargas on some 4,000 demonstrators. in a bid to ease the crisis syrian's president is expected to lift the nearly 50-year state of emergency and move to lift restrictions on civil liberties. the country's emergency laws that gave police almost unlimited power to arrest without arpblgs will be lifted prior to the elections in september. this comes as the interim military rulers says hosni mubarak is under house arrest in egypt. this half he went for medical treatment. gregg: it has been ten days since the military mission began, and the president expected to tell the nation the mission is justified. white house correspondent mike emanuel live in washington with more on that. what else do we know about the case that president obama is going to make tonight? >> reporter:
made the case on u.s. involvement in libya, the military is preparing to scale back the role and let nato take command. at the same time, members from 40 nations gather in london to discuss the end game in libya and a possible future without muammar qaddafi. at home nato allied supreme commander in europe, is telling congress he is optimistic muammar qaddafi will fall under the pressure. >> we have a chance at muammar qaddafi leaving because the entire international community is again him. >>shepard: muammar qaddafi ruled for four decades and repeatedly said he will never give up and despite international strikes against his military, the rebels say the government is better armed and organization than anything makeshift they come up with. there are muammar qaddafi's government tanks and rockets driving back the open opposition. though are trying to retreat, the relatives from a town. >> regular cars are fighting with machine guns, et cetera, et cetera, we did not have arms or we would finish muammar qaddafi in a few days. >>shepard: a spokesman for the opposition in london asking the
, and what u.s., nato and allied roles will be, we talked to senators john mccain and jack reed. >> there are times where the greatest nation in the world and the strong eh nation in the world has to act alone, that is not the preference, and the preference is to build coalitions as we have most of the times in the past. i think that president obama may be unintentionally or intentionally conveying the impression that we can never act alone. i don't think that is appropriate, given possible scenarios. >> as we have seen, this trance formative effect in egypt and tunisia, i can't we want to encourage that but we want to recognize it is best done through a coalition, it is best done by using the particularly unique capabilities of the united states, but not committing our forces to long-term engagements. >> and david ignatius of the washington post, david ignatius, doyle mcmanus and julianna goldman. >> it is exhilarating seeing for people calling for change and sweeping away governments and yet where it is going, what the risks are for the united states, nobody knows, and i think
belong to al-qaeda. >>> and u.s. supreme court justice skeela has been ticketed for causing an accident along the george washington parkway. the 75-year-old was on his way to the high court when he rear ended the car in front of him setting off a chain reaction. >>> mayor stephanie rawlings- blake will unveil her budgets today. in it, there's 8% less spending for the year of 2012. some of the cuts include reduced funding for the 311 center. the document doesn't include tax increases. >>> there's a surprise for cavaliers fans. opening lineups are announced for the heat. lebron james doesn't appear. >> lebron james. [crowd booing] >> lebron james was in the bathroom. the calvs got the last laugh. the heat lost. 102-90. >>> the orioles finished up spring chaining and broke records doing so. more than 115,000 fans finished up at a renovated smith stadium. ed smith stadium hosted ten sellouts. a average attendance was 70,200,019. that's a lot. >>> and the oriole's home opener is this monday. our special pregame coverage starts at 2:00 and stick around for the game itself. a full day of oriol
] [inaudible conversations] >>> top officials from the u.s. nuclear regulatory commission told senators today that the damaged nuclear power plant in japan, quote come continues to further stabilize, and that there have been no radiation readings in the u.s. the might be of concern. these remarks came before the meeting of the senate energy and natural resources committee. other speakers included officials from the energy department, the nuclear energy institute and the union of concerned scientists. this is an hour and 45 minutes. >> thank you for being here. this is a briefing. this is not a hearing has such. the reason we try to it as a briefing is so that people wouldn't have to file written testimony 72 hours ahead of time and all of that and things are changing very quickly with regard to the evolving situation that the nuclear power plant. will the committee doesn't have direct oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants we do have to consider how events such as those affect the ability of the nation's nuclear fleet of 104 reactors to supply electricity, this of course the 104 react
: secretary of defense robert gates from over the weekend saying libya is not an imminent threat to the u.s. but the director saying the u.s. clearly has an interest there. is that good enough? chuck nash, sir, good morning to you. there was a lot said over the weekend, some view it as conflicts statements, others say no, this gives us greater clarification. take robert gates. what do you make of his comment? >> i think he was spot on. this is not in critical national interest for the united states, however, we do have interests in the region with tunisia on one side and ejit on the other side. bill: hillary clinton said something i thought was a little more -- i thought it was revealing. she said there was no perfect option and i think everybody that looks at this, yeah, that's right, hopefully that's why you took military action. hopefully we'll have a clarification continue. -- tonight. are they split or on the same side? >> i think there was u animinity before this was launched and secretary of state clinton said something else on another network. after isn't gates said no, it's not in
of that u.s. fighter jet and we are happy to report both crew members are safe and in u.s. hands. we are covering the angles from the points on the map. nic robertson in tripoli and chris lawrence at the pentagon and retired navy captain alec frazier is here at the cnn center. chris, what is the pentagon saying about this? >> reporter: well, they are saying, bottom line, carol, is that both of these crew members are now off libyan soil and safely back in u.s. hands, but the story of how they got there, is just fascinating. this crew took off from a base in italy overnight and they were on a strike mission. in other words, they weren't necessarily just patrolling. this was a fighter jet specifically designed to go after some of moammar gadhafi's air defense systems. overnight at some point, the military plane got into some mechanical problems and both of the crew members ejected. their chutes worked just fine but they landed in different places. the pilot was picked up by an osprey. that was sitting off the coast about a hundred miles on the "uss kearsarge." the marines, the 26 marine
housing the u.s. mission to the united nations. the ronald h. brown building was commerce secretary during clinton's first term in office. >>> the shuttle "endeavour" arrives in the space shuttle tonight. it's set to lift off for the final space mission. it's time to continue to suzanne malveaux. i'll be over to talk about the obama doctrine. >>> live from studio 7, i'm suzanne malveaux. want to get you up to speed. i want to go directly to ras lanouf. what is the latest over there? >> hi, suzanne, well, for the last hour and a half, we've been hearing and seeing a fairly heavy artillery barrage. we've been hearing the explosions taking place on the other side of ras lanouf. they are trading artillery with gadhafi's military. this is a blow to the opposition that has been forced back from its positions in ben jawad, 40 miles to the west of here. they came under heavy sustained artillery, tank and rocket fire, as well as snipers inside that town firing on them. they were unable to sustain that, stand up against it. we saw them beating a hastety retreat from ben jawad coming here to r
.com click on the you decide link today. we're asking if the u.s. should arm libya's rebels. there are some questions about that. click on your answer and you can see how other people are voting. so far more than a thouf you have weighed in. you can check it out at so many tkpwres, about who the opposition is. gregg: the president didn't talk about arming the rebels but a lot of people are saying he really should have done that. we want your thoughts on that. in the meantime there is a new wave of protests in yemen this morning. take a look at this demonstrators calling for the immediate ouster of ali abdullah saleh and demanding political reforms. now ali abdullah saleh has promised to september down at the end of his term, dozens of protesters have been killed in yemen since antigovernment violent tkepl straeugtss broke out last month. and now syria where president's has resigned, they just quit. human rights groups claiming that dozen of antigovernment protesters were killed by the syrian troops. hundreds of house of progovernment demonstrators are flooding the streets of da
for the u.s., the intel community, works very hard to provide the administration, whatever administration is, with the best information possible and available at that moment. whoever has the best information likely is going to make the best decisions in the best interest of the u.s., which is not to engage in war overseas. there is a tendency to think that is what we're doing, that are warmongers. the real world is, unfortunately, more difficult. i would argue that thegency, you know, is a tool used by any administration to enhance transparency, to minimize the risk that people face overseas, that the government faces overseas. then again people will be watching this. ey will think hey that mike baker is pretty subjective. hostmimike baker a >> president obama is speaking about libya later today from national defense university. ahead of the speech, the associated press wrote that the white house made it clear that it was not a precedent for involvement in other nations that hold strategic interests for the u.s.. we will have the president's speech live at 7:30 eastern and we will take your
is a highly developed country. it is as technologically sophisticated as us, and there's much concern in the u.s. that a similar accident can occur here. how do you respond to that concern? >> well, first, i would agree with you. the reactor in chernobyl was of a different design. it was-- it had point of instability. it had no containment vessel. but we are looking very carefully at what is naepg japan because, as you say, they're using more advanced designs. a number of reactors in the united states have similar designs, and we're going to look at what went wrong in terms of the double-barreled whammy this huge, hung earthquake and huge su, and look to our reactors again and learn as much as we can so we can, if needed, improve the safety. by "if needed" what i really mean is we're always increasing the safety of our reactors, and not only our reactors but the safety of all our industrial systems. >> mr. secretary, two days ago a number of us wrote to chairman upton, whitfield, and stearns, asking our committee here investigate and hold hearings about the safety and prepared understandness of
american fighters jets are active at the moment, u.s. pilots flew 113 of the 175 coalition air sorties yesterday, for example, that u.s. role will shrink dramatically in the next few days leaving others to decide on military targeting. on the ground all public signals from the regime suggest continued defiance and continued attacks on the opposition. but here's the intriguing nugget. senior u.s. officials tell cnn tonight that some members of gadhafi's inner circle are reaching out to the state department and reaching out to other arab nations, as well. curious contacts to say the least but as yet our sources tell us no indication gadhafi himself is looking to negotiate an exit strategy. >> i think there are any number of possible outcomes here, and no one is in a position to predict them. whether they're -- whether there are major further defections or divisions within his family, there are a variety of possibilities that seems to me. >> a variety of possibilities but listen here, secretary gates isn't betting on a peaceful settlement. >> gadhafi has basically sworn that he will show
the objective and u.s. involvement in the conflict. he did defend his decision to engage u.s. military forces in that conflict. in his weekly radio address today, he touted the successes of u.s. and coalition forces saying they have both helped to knock down moammar gadhafi's air defense mechanisms as well as push back his ground forces. the president said that he had to engage in this conflict to do to save lives. >> the united states should not and cannot intervene every time there's a crisis somewhere in the world. but i firmly believe that when innocent people are being brutalized, when someone like gadhafi threatens a blood bath that could destabilize an entire region, and when the international community is prepared to come together to save many thousands of lives, then it's in our national interest to act. >> reporter: but the president is facing mounting criticisms from lawmakers on both sides of the aisle who say there is a lack of congressional involvement in setting up u.s. policy in libya. and the president held a conference call with congressional leaders yesterday, trying to add
denouncing their president hosni mubarak. egypt is a major beneficiary of u.s. foreign aid. the u.s. was in the awkward position of supporting the pro-democracy demonstrators without alienating a longtime ally. after weeks of bloody confrontations in tahrir square, longtime president mubarak stepped down. now to libya. click on it, and gives you the latest developments and everything you need to know. libya has become the focal point of this historic movement. rebels dwept into dozens of key cities until moammar gadhafi unleashed military forces on his own people and that prompted nato to get involved with strategic air strikes. this fever has now spread to syria. again, all of the information on bahrain, of course, on the map here and also in yemen as well. anything can happen. john? >> and truly important questions coming out of this, what's going to happen next and why is this happening? mohammed jamjoon is live in abu dab toe answer some of these questions. let's start with syria. it appears the arab awakening is there. president assad is facing a tough choice with viol
in the price of crude equals to a $40 billion withdrawal of funds from the u.s. economy. that's just america's stats of the take that around the world and see how bad it is to have crude go higher. this is a serious problem. we need to stop crude from going higher and certainly pulling the speculators from the market is a way to slow down the price movement because if you do not have reason to take delivery, you would not just be buying for a pure speculator to make money. >>neil: but you physically have to have the oil. interesting. thank you very much. >>guest: thank you for having me. >>neil: coalition forces flying 175 anythings over libya but they will not get him from the united arab emirates refusing to join blaming the decision on "u.s. policies toward bahrain," which is facing its own revolt. and our guest says if they will not get involved, why are we? the former head of the c.i.a. osama bin laden unit, and i don't buy their reason. how bahrain is an excuse, that strikes me as them getting cold feet on looking like they are participating in an arab crackdown. >>guest: i think it is
to he reclaim ground they had lost. >> that said, secretary gates, would the u.s. supply arms to the rebels? >> no decision has been made about that at this point. the security council resolution would permit it, the second resolution, 1973, would permit it. but no decisions have been made by our government about that. >> but does this administration want to see the rebels prevail and overtake gadhafi? >> i think the president's policy is that it's time for gadhafi to go. that's not part of our military mission, which has been very limited and very strictly defined. >> how is that going to happen? secretary clinton you said this week you thought you were picking up signals that he wanted to get out of his own accord. >> well, there are many different aspects to the strategy that the international community is pursuing. as bob has said, the military mission has gone very well. it only started just eight days ago so it has been remarkably well coordinated and focused and now nato will take command and control over it. at the same time, we are pursuing really strict economic sanc
up to speed on march 31st. >>> u.s. intelligence source says cia operatives are on the ground in libya today to size up rebel fighters. the source says they are not there for battlefield direction. congress asked defense secretary robert gates about the cia story a short time ago. >> do you see the use of cia and u.s. special forces in libya as following the blueprint we used in afghanistan? >> first of all, i can't speak to any cia activities, but i will tell you that the president has been quite clear that in terms of the united states' military there will be no boots on the ground. >> britain says it has not promised immunity to libya's top diplomat. foreign minister moussa koussa defected wednesday. they say this man moi be a treasure trove of information. >> reporter: it's significant for many reasons, not the least of which he was former head of intelligence. not least of which is because he was at one time a wanted figure by european security services. this is a man whose disappearance here wasn't even known by the deputy foreign minister. >> libyan rebels remain in ful
a nationwide review to see if u.s. plants are vulnerable to the same type of earthquake that hit japan. the indian point station is about 25 miles from new york city has two operating nuclear reactors and it sits right on top of the ramapo fault line. the nrc filed a report uncovering a higher safety risk at the plant than previously thought. and that's gotten the attention of new york governor andrew cuomo, a long-time opponent of indian point. >> the world has changed. reevalua reevaluate. reevaluate and look at the situation and decide whether or not you should grant this facility a license today. with what you know today. >> now, we had a chance to speak with officials from energy corp. on our show last week. they say they welcome a safety review. 27 nuclear reactors, including indian point have been singled out for inspections by the nrc. allan chernoff has been granted exclusive access inside the indian point plant and we'll have his report coming up in the next hour of "american morning." >>> another morning of explosions in tripoli and heavy aircraft fire. as of last night, the
then become the largest class action employment suit in u.s. history. walmart, america's largest private employer, says, no, the class would be too big, the plaintiffs too dissimilar, the issues too many to litigate. the plaintiffs say walmart wants a big company exception to civil rights 0 law. two lower federal courts have ruled the class and case can go forward. that brings us to the supreme court where we now have three women justices, the most ever. cnn's kate bolduan has been following the case for us and joins us to recap the arguments. kate, good to see you. any sign that the women justices were at all receptive to the plaintiffs? >> reporter: that's very interesting. i would say, first off, that it did seem in the courtroom with the aggressive question you did hear from the female justices, that they were receptive to the women's claims to the sides of the plaintiffs. but, as i just said, there are three women on this court. so what it's looking like -- we always have to give it a huge caveat here because of course we never know until the justices rule -- from the commentary and
the american people what the u.s. role is in this mission. plenty of confusion right now on that front. >>> in japan, water with radiation levels 100,000 times the norm. and fears that some of it might be in the pacific ocean. >>> in libya, rebel forces are marching toward the capital. and after a weekend of key victories, the most pivotal fight may now be under way. cnn's resa is in libya where rebels seem to have seized the momentum. first off why the turnaround? >> i'm sorry, carol, i couldn't hear you. >> i just asked you why the turnaround for the libyan rebels? >> well, i think it had a lot to do with the air strikes. the coalition air strikes that started saturday. and there's no question that the momentum has shifted. i don't think too many people could have predicted in a matter of three days, these opposition forces would gain about 200 miles in territory and capture about five key cities. but that's exactly what has happened. the latest town to go into the habds of opposition forces, the town of ben jawad. and i think this surge, this shift in momentum started on saturday wi
. of course, it's been french, british, u.s. fighter jets that have been launching most of the air strikes. again, today another set of air strikes, according to a french official, in or near tripoli targeting a command center, brooke. >> reza, here is a new town, we're all learning, gadhafi's birthplace. we know the rebels are moving westward toward sirte. is that the next big battle, symbolic battle as well, for rebels here? >> reporter: well, it looks like it's the first battle in about three days. the opposition forces over the past 72 hours have been making it look relatively easy, rolling toward the west. this is the first time they're seeing resistance, little bit of fighting. that's probably because sirte is the hometown, the birthplace of colonel gadhafi. he has a lot of supporters, not clear how many have remained in this location. his tribe is based out of this place. rebel fighters telling cnn they're seeing some resistance, telling us that gadhafi loyalists using sha containry, trickery. one rebel fighter telling us that it looks like civilians have been armed. opposition figh
at the fukushima daiichi nuclear power plant. while this committee does not have oversight on the safety of u.s. nuclear plants, we do have to consider how events such as those at fukushima affected the ability of our nation's nuclear freedom, 104 reactors, to supply electricity. of course, these 104 reactors currently account for about 20% of the electricity that we use and what the future of nuclear energy will be as part of our nation's energy banks. events at fukushima are changing by the our. they are serious, and we are watching those events unfold on the other side of the world. our knowledge at best is incomplete. as we look forward to these experts and forming a committee on what they see at the plant, how would impact our nation must existing fleet of reactors, and answer questions the committee members might have. before i introduce our two -- our first panel, we have four witnesses, two on this first panel and two on the second trip before i introduced the panel, let me call on senator murkowski for comment. >> let me welcome those who are presenting today. i appreciate the time is
in the u.s. >>> a killer whale that drowned its trainer, one year ago, today, he is back in the show at sea world. some are asking if it's too soon, or even safe at all. it's all new, all live. it's "happening now". jon: good morning to you! i'm jon scott. jenna: hi everybody, i'm jenna lee. nice to have you back, jon. >>> "happening now", major setbacks in the rebels in libya, proqaddafi forces forcing them to retreat from a key oil town. it's a big story, jon. jon: it's a rapid reversal coming days after the opposition made gains west and trying to take over qaddafi's home town. nato war planes flying over the zones with the heaviest fighting, witnesses reporting hearing explosions indicating a new round of air strikes. jenna: all the chaos is affecting the oil industry. that is the industry in libya. we have word today that only one refinery is still functioning. there are now fears of a fuel shortage in libya. how that fight affect the fight. and also what that means for the rest of the world so dependent on oil now. rick leventhal is traveling to benghazi now, he's going to call us in
, and these are u.s. company that is have their core base here. the good news is i think if we meet the object i haves -- objectives that we've talked about, we will stimulate clean technologies, software, hardware, all of the real disruptive technologies that we are talking about. they are global, their competitors are global, they have to be global. i think if we do the right thing, we are going to do well by exports. which is real positive. >> this is a really important point. we tend to maybe think of these things in silos. but one the president's key initiatives is doubling exports over the next five years. and, of course, that involves, you know, large companies, boeing and others. when you look at the numbers, the real way we're going to do is in increasing in the small and medium-sized enterprises. turns out that 30% of the exports are from small and medium-sized enterprises. and that's disproportionally small. and there's only 250,000 small companies that export. so if you look at the math, there's almost three million small businesses $30 million smalls. xiii of them who have traded go
. at the same time, u.s. and coalition partners kept up the military attacks, launching 22 cruise missile on targets in tripoli. qaddafi's forces, however, are still better armed than the opposition and today they have the rebels on the run. they were forced to retreat just as they prepared to attack qaddafi's hometown of surt. instead, though, they were pushed back more than 25 miles, and not just by the military baby civilians who remain loyal to qaddafi. mandy clark reports tonight from the ever-shifting front line. >> reporter: an attack by qaddafi forces took rebels by surprise at bin jawad. they fought hard with everything they had but were forced back. and even while fleeing came under fire. they had originally retreated to the town because of a new threat rebels here say it wasn't just government forces but also residents firing from their homes that forced them to pull back. they confiscated these weapons handed out by qaddafi forces from locals who were loyal to the regime. how many weapons did you find in total? >> reporter: another problem the anti-qaddafi forces are facing: s
. privately, a senior u.s. official told fox news is administration is not yet convinced arming rebels will bring about the desired outcome. publicly, they said only that high-level washington is still getting to know the rag-tag rebel army. >> we are continuing to discuss and have the conversation with the opposition, to assess what the makeup of it is. >> we have been clear we reached out to the opposition, working with them and assist them in the effort to bring about transition to democratic process. >> you do want hem to win? >> i don't now to be more clear to say what we want to emerge is gaddafi step down and see a peaceful transition to a democratic process. >> tuesday, the nato supreme commander testified to the senate u.s. intelligence detected flickers of evidence that the rebel ranks included members of al-qaeda. so they're unsure whether the rebels are the kind of entity we'd provide weapons to. at the highest level they warned that president obama has a week, but not a month, to make up his mind. >> there is a lot of the stake here. you have the arab league, the security
this country ask, why is the u.s. part of this operation? his own defense secretary telling abc news today this is not a vital national interest. so, as the president prepares to address the nation tomorrow, can he convince americans that the u.s. should be involved in this operation? as the u.s. hands over power to nato, what is the end game for american forces? and will there be a deal for gadhafi to get him out? david kerley leads us off at the white house tonight. david? >> reporter: good evening, david. the administration attacked the air waves today, making its case a week into the bombing of libya, a day before the president's big speech. and even the president's own defense secretary admitted on abc's "this week" that libya did not pose a threat. >> do you think libya posed an actual imminent threat to the united states? >> no, no. it was not -- it was not a vital national interest to the united states. but it was an interest. >> reporter: an interest, gates says, because gadhafi threatened to slaughter his own people. facing congressional and public criticism, the president in his
financial enemies were likely responsible for the u.s. financial collapse in 2008. that doesn't mean we're -- we were irresponsible as well, but they took advantage. the attack, which began in 2007, he says is a three-tiered attack the report claims two of the phases are complete. two of them. but the third one is not. he says it may be underway right now. he also, freeman, reports here on who the lead suspects would be. he said islamic terrorists. hostile members of the chinese military. or groups in russia. who are the best positioned in the economic battle space. now, here is where this thing doesn't feel right to me. this report came out back in 2009. the only reason why we're seeing it now is because someone in the d.o.d. thought that this report should be brought to public attention. it was made in 2009. the d.o.d. thought it should be brought to your attention. that alone to me is the biggest warning bell here. it should put your radar up, at least maybe say maybe i should read this and look into it. why should it be brought to your attention now? well, let me ask you, what was t
. they will not be successful doing so. >>> u.s. soldier jeremy morelock has pleaded guilty to charges he and other soldiers killed afghan citizens for sport last year. but morelock's possible life sentence was reduced to 24 years in a plea deal. german news magazines have published photographs showing morelock and other soldiers posing over the bodies of dead afghans. >>> allied attacks on tripoli are continuing into a sixth day. take a look at these pictures. they're from libyan state tv, and they reportedly show the destruction at a military base in tripoli. look at that fire raging. these were apparently filmed just after a coalition air strike. the coalition attacks on military targets have now grounded gadhafi's air force and crippled the country's air defenses. so strikes from now on are focusing more on ground troops as they move toward rebel-held towns to try and recapture them. >>> the libyan government says a number of civilians have been killed by coalition air strikes including women and children. to prove it, they bundled foreign reporter on it a convoy of buses to show them a house they said
and everyone saying, look, because it's the u.s. ally. mubarak was an ally. if it falls it could affect the entire region. >> that could happen in syria and also in yemen and jordan, major u.s. concerns this morning. >> and clayton mentioned in libya, it's good news, the rebels have taken ajdabiya, but now there's some on the left who are really criticizing the president for even getting involved in libya, calling this a where and unconstitutional as near as congress's dennis kucinich. >> the president exceeded his power and people should look at the constitution, look at article, one, section 8 and they put the war power in the hands of the congress. look at article two, that deals with the executive. there's nothing in there that gives the president the power to commit our troops to war. >> it's a gray area and studying constitutional history, very few presidents declared war. five u.s. presidents declared war and we've been in a lot more wars than that. and the white house responding. james carney, taking questions outlined by members of congress have been largely answered in a very
says it will be hosting a summit in london next week. progress on the u.s. mandate intervention in libya. the u.s. military said there is no indication that coalition air strikes resulted in any civilian casualties. wednesday night, sites again or targeted in the capital of tripoli. bobby gaddafi -- gaddafi's tanks in israel were hit. schelling's have resumed. >> a propaganda war is also being waged in libya. brandishing, a presenter on libyan state television pledged to give his last breath for libyan leader gaddafi. state television also broadcast images of gaddafi's supporters staging demonstrations and gaddafi himself making a brief public appearance for the first time in days. speaking from his compound, gaddafi pledged victo, denouncinghat he called the unjustified aggression of crusader nations. although the united nations- backed strike had forced his troops to retreat, battles are still waiting on the ground. rebels and regime forces are still fighting for control in eastern libya, where thehave been engaged in a standoff for days. the u.s. president says intervention w
we think this is going to be? can they make up for these losses? >> u.s. investors are rattled. coach shares are down 8%, but if you look at the long-term outlook, it looks a little better for these retailers. it's going to take a few months, but japanese contention there will eventually rebound, and what they're doing right now is pushing hard into china trying to grow their businesses. also here in the u.s., we see the demand for luxury goods improving that's rebounding with the economic recovery here in the u.s. suzanne? >> all right, allison, thank you. appreciate it. >>> we want to go beyond the headlines now on the recovery of those two airmen after their fighter jet crashed in libya. we're learning more about how the chain of events played out. u.n. forces rescued the pilot and libyans found the weapons officer. >> i am speaking with him and i kiss him and i tell him you are coming for us. you are our brothers. so don't be afraid. you will be safe. we will carry you anyplace you want. >> for more details on the crash and the recovery, i want to bring in our pentagon corresponde
to take control of the sky over libya. possibly changing the role for u.s. troops in that region, and president obama is preparing his remarks on the situation there. >>> and running for cover in the middle east. protesters in syria met with a hail of gunfire. is that the next domino to fall? from the cnn center in atlanta, georgia, this is your cnn "saturday morning." thank you for spending part of your weekend with us. we do want to start in japan right now where there is growing concerns over radiation levels in the ocean near that damaged nuclear plant, but there is some positive news as well from the fukushima plant. radiation levels in the air seem to be decreasing. cnn's paula hancocks live in tokyo. paula, hello. sounds like good news/bad news. let's start with the bad news. >> reporter: that's right, t.j. well, this is the water in the sea just off the coast of the fukushima nuclear plant. according to japan's nuclear safety agency, the levels of radioactive iodine are more than 1,200 levels than they should be. a cause for alarm. we're hearing from the agency it's only
. and the biggest demonstrations and rolling out i'm told in 20 european cities, at least 36 u.s. cities plan for similar type union sympathizing demonstrations in this country, whereof course, this is an extension of what happened not only in portugal last week, where austerity measures were rejected by the parliament and everything went kablewy and this is wisconsin and the union crackdown there, but they're all united in this one respect, they're ticked. and if unions win there, is that trouble for us here everywhere? after this. what does it take to fly? it takes knowing we have our work cut out for us. but if you run before the wind you can't take off. you've got to turn into it. the thing you push against lifts you up. so, every challenge is a chance to show that even in this crazy world of no liquids and route cancellations someone still has the passenger's back. and along the way we'll prove we're not just building a bigger airline we're building a better one. >> all right. still keeping sour eye on london right now. thanks got a little violent today and this is a sort of global demo
. the u.s. is making it increasingly clear that having been in the lead of the libyan mission, it wants to step back now. the latest reports from the rebel-held town talk of pro gaddafi snipers filing at the hospital. -- firing at the hospital. >> please, please bomb his forces until they stop. i have to be impartial because i am a medical person, but five, six consecutive days that have been killing with tanks and artillery, bombing us. please stop him. >> other residents say they have attacked their base. the rebels remain for now force of on certain potential, but it is clear the situation is increasingly turning into a test of the coalition possibility to influence events on the ground. -- the coalition's ability to influence events on the ground. >> with me now it is ben brown. there has been much activity around you today? >> the rebels are still trying to push west, about an hour-and- a-half from here, trying to take advantage of the coalition air strikes and military action which they are seeing day after day, night after night. the rebels are making heavy delegate of getting an
the situation in libya as "unique" and said the u.s. intervened militarily to prevent a humanitarian crisis. >> it's true that america cannot use our military wherever repression occurs. and given the costs and risks of intervention, we must always measure our interests against the need for action. but that cannot be an argument for never acting on behalf of what's right. of course, there is no question that libya and the world would be better off with gadhafi out of power. i along with many other world leaders have embraced that goal. and will actively pursue it through non-military means. but broadening our military mission to include regime change would be a mistake. >> and to further that point on regime change, the president said "weapon went down that road in iraq." he also said that history is not on gadhafi's side. he says nato will assume full control of the libyan mission wednesday, and the u.s. will play a supporting role, reducing the risk and the cost of the operation. >>> the president's speech was not enough to satisfy some critics on capitol hill. house speaker john boehner
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